Violent repression of gay rights activists in Cuba exposes socialism’s deep-seated homophobia

John Suarez in Notes from the Cuban Exile Quarter:

Castro regime agents beat down and arrest Gay activists at Pride Parade in Havana

“Gay rights” in Cuba are like all the other “rights”: nonexistent. – Ambassador Roger Noriega, over Twitter on May 11, 2019

On Saturday, May 11, 2019 the Castro regime’s efforts at Pinkwashing its totalitarian edifice came crashing down as gay rights activists were beaten down, arrested and taken away for carrying out a Gay Pride march in Havana.

It is important to recall that there is a deep-seated homophobia at the heart of communist ideology that viewed it as a symptom of bourgeois or capitalist contamination. This resulted in the systematic repression of homosexuals in Communist China and the Soviet Union. In the Soviet Union homosexuality was criminalized in 1933, “punishable by prison and hard labor, and Stalinist anti-gay policies persisted throughout the 1960s and 1970s.” In 1949 upon taking power in Mainland China the communists declared homosexuality a symptom of “bourgeois decadence” and set out to eliminate it.

On March 13, 1963 Fidel Castro gave a speech were he openly attacked “long-haired layabouts, the children of bourgeois families,” roaming the streets wearing “trousers that are too tight,” carrying guitars to look like Elvis Presley, who took “their licentious behavior to the extreme” of organizing “effeminate shows” in public places. The Cuban dictator warned: “They should not confuse the Revolution’s serenity and tranquility with weaknesses in the Revolution. Our society cannot accept these degeneracies.”

Fidel Castro went further in 1965 declaring: “We would never come to believe that a homosexual could embody the conditions and requirements of conduct that would enable us to consider him a true revolutionary, a true communist militant.” … A deviation of that nature clashes with the concept we have of what a militant communist should be.

In 1964 the Castro regime began rounding up Gays and sending them to Military Units to Aid Production or UMAPs (Unidades Militares de Ayuda a la Producción). These forced labor camps were for those suspected of or found guilty of “improper conduct.”  Persons with effeminate mannerisms: what the Cuban government called “extravagant behavior” were taken to these camps.  

April 11th marked the 35th anniversary of the release of Improper Conduct, the film that exposed communist intolerance to Gays and Lesbians in Cuba, and documents what happened during the first 30 years of the Castro regime.  One month later and the relevance of this film was seen in the streets of Havana, Cuba.

Continue reading HERE.

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